Cannabis Research: Cancer Posted on 15 Jan 13:45

Cancer is a large group of diseases, which results in uncontrolled and rapid cell growth. Due to the uncontrolled growth of the cancer cells invade the surrounding healthy tissue and destroy it. Cancer usually starts in one part of the body, but can spread through the bloodstream and lymphatic system. There are more than 200 types of cancer that occur in humans, which all have different symptoms, depending on where they are located.
Brain cancer studies:
1) Anti-tumor effects of cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive cannabinoid, on human glioma cell lines (anti-tumor effects of cannabidiol, a cannabinoid Nonpsychoactive, on Human Glioma Cell Lines - 2003)
Under laboratory conditions, research has been conducted in order to investigate the hypothesis that CBD have anti-tumor properties. It was found that CBD is the viability of the tumor cells dropped significantly, suggesting that CBD is an effective antitumor agent. Published in the "Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics."
2) Neuroprotection by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main active compound in marijuana, against ouabain induced by excitotoxicity in the living organism (Neuroprotection by Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol, the Main Active Compound in Marijuana, against Ouabain-Induced In Vivo excitotoxicity - 2001)
This research was designed to investigate the effects of THC on acute brain damage and brain degenerative diseases. It has been found that THC has an effect that protects the brain from degenerative diseases. Published in the "Journal of Neuroscience."
3) A pilot clinical study of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (A pilot clinical study of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme - 2006)
This study was the first that was designed to explore the antitumor properties of cannabinoids in a clinical setting. She came to positive results, and it was found that THC and other cannabinoids inhibit tumor growth in patients. Published in the "British Journal of Cancer."
4) A combined preclinical therapy of cannabinoids and temozolomide against glioma (A Combined Preclinical Therapy of Cannabinoids and Temozolomide against Glioma - 2011)
This research aimed to evaluate the use of THC in conjunction with the drug TMZ in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme - the most common and very resistant form of brain cancer. It has been found that the combined treatment showed that the reversed-tumor activity. Published in the journal "Molecular Cancer Therapeutics."
Breast cancer studies:
1) Anti-tumor activity of plant cannabinoids with emphasis on the effect of cannabidiol on human breast carcinoma (anti-tumor activity of plant cannabinoids with emphasis on the effect of cannabidiol on human breast carcinoma - 2006)
This research recognizes the antitumor effects of THC, but claims that it was problematic because of its psychoactive properties. Therefore, they went on to assess the effects of other cannabinoids. It was found that CBD showed promising anticarcinogenic characteristics that should be investigated further. Published in the "Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics."
2) pathways in mediating the effects of cannabidiol on the reduction of breast cancer cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis (Pathways mediating the effects of cannabidiol on the reduction of breast cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis - 2010)
This study was designed to determine the effects of CBD on breast cancer cells. It was found that it inhibited the growth and the spread of these cancer cells. It has also been discovered that CBD significantly reduced the tumor mass. Published in the "U.S. Library of Medicine."
3) Cannabinoids reduce ErbB2-driven breast cancer progression through AKT inhibition (Cannabinoids reduce ErbB2-driven breast cancer progression through AKT inhibition - 2010)
This research describes experiments that were performed to assess the effects of cannabinoids on the very aggressive ERB2-positive breast cancer. They concluded that cannabinoids both tumor growth, as well as the amount of existing tumors appeared to decrease, which strongly suggests that they represent a real application for the therapeutic treatment of breast cancer. Published in the journal "Molecular Cancer."
4) The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation (The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide Inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation - 1998)
This research was designed to investigate the effects of cannabinoids on the proliferation of breast cancer cells. It has been found to inhibit the growth. Published in the "National Academy of Sciences (PNAS)."
Lung cancer studies:
1) Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol inhibits both triggered by the epithelial growth factor lung cancer cell migration outside of the living organism, as well as the growth and metastasis in the living organism (Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Inhibits epithelial growth factor-induced lung cancer cell migration in vitro as well as its growth and metastasis in vivo - 2008)
This research was conducted to study the effects of THC to the epithelial growth factor induced by cancer - a particularly aggressive and resistant to chemotherapy form of cancer. It was found that THC has played a significant role in inhibiting cancer growth, which justifies further research in this direction. Published in the journal "Oncogene."
2) Cannabidiol inhibits lung cancer cell invasion and metastasis via the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (Cannabidiol Inhibits lung cancer cell invasion and metastasis via intercellular adhesion molecule-1-2011)
In this research, it was tried to examine the effects of CBD on the invasiveness of cancer. It has been found that cannabinoids inhibit the invasiveness of the primary tumor cells in patients with lung cancer. Published in the "U.S. National Library of Medicine."
3) The cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 as new targets for the inhibition of large cell lung cancer growth and metastasis (cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, as novel targets for inhibition of non-small cell lung cancer growth and metastasis - 2011)
This research was conducted to determine the role of the cannabinoid receptor activation in lung cancer. It has been found that both inhibit the growth of cancer cells and enhance their apoptosis - the natural process of cell death. Published in the "U.S. National Library of Medicine."
Prostate cancer studies:
1) Anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of anandamide in human Prostatakrebszellinien: implication of the reduction of epidermal growth factor receptors and ceramide production (anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of anandamide in human prostatic cancer cell lines: implication of epidermal growth factor receptor down-regulation and ceramide production - 2003)
This study describes how the activation of cannabinoid receptors causes an antiproliferative effect in cancer cells in the prostate, which has major implications for the treatment of prostate cancer. Published in the "U.S. National Library of Medicine."
2) The role of cannabinoids in prostate cancer: basic scientific point of view and possible clinical applications (The role of cannabinoids in prostate cancer: Basic science perspective and potential clinical applications - 2012)
This study conducted a multi-evaluation of many other previous research on prostate cancer to determine whether cannabinoids have a practical clinical application. It has been found that it is in everyone's best interest to conduct clinical trials of medical cannabis. Published in the "U.S. National Library of Medicine."
3) Non-THC Cannabinoids inhibit prostate cancer growth in vitro and in vivo: Pro-apoptotic effects and the underlying mechanisms (non-THC cannabinoids inhibit prostate carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo: pro-apoptotic effects and underlying mechanisms - 2013)
This research was designed to extend the previously explored idea that cannabinoid receptor activation causes cell death in prostate cancer cells. The research found significant positive results and found that the data supported the clinical tests of CBD from prostate cancer patients. Published in the "U.S. National Library of Medicine."
Blood cancer studies:
1) cannabinoid receptor-mediated apoptosis induced by R (+)-methanandamide and WIN55 0.212-2 is associated with ceramide accumulation and p38 activation in mantle cell lymphoma (Cannabinoid Receptor-Mediated Apoptosis Induced by R (+)-Methanandamide and WIN55, 212 - 2 Is Associated with Ceramide Accumulation and p38 Activation in Mantle Cell Lymphoma - 2006)
This research was designed to explore whether cannabinoids inhibit cancer cells in lymphomas. It describes that it has been found that cannabinoids inhibit the growth and induce cell death in mantle cell lymphoma (blood cancer). Published in the journal "Molecular Pharmacology."
2) triggered by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol apoptosis in Jurkat T-leukemia cells is regulated by the translocation of BAD mitochondria. (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced apoptosis in Jurkat leukemia T cells is regulated by translocation of Bad to mitochondria - 2006)
This research discusses how the use of cannabinoids in apoptosis (regulated and the natural death of cells) is to be evaluated. They yielded positive results, and it was found that cannabinoids actually cause the death of carcinogenic leukemia cells. Published in the "U.S. National Library of Medicine."
3) Activation of cannabinoid receptors type 1 and type 2 in non-Hodgkin lymphoma: growth inhibition by receptor activation (expression of cannabinoid receptors type 1 and type 2 in non-Hodgkin lymphoma: Growth inhibition by receptor activation - 2008)
This research aimed to determine the effects of the cannabinoid receptor activation on lymphomas. It has been found that the cannabinoid receptor activation, the multiplication and growth of lymphoma reduced, and causes the death of some cancer cells. Published in "International Journal of Cancer."
Oral cancer studies:
Cannabinoids inhibit cellular respiration of human oral cancer cells (Cannabinoids inhibit cellular respiration of human oral cancer cells - 2010)
This research was aimed to investigate the effects of cannabinoids on cell respiration in certain types of oral cancer. It has been found that cannabinoids inhibit cancer cell respiration and therefore have a toxic effect on them. This implies that cannabinoids may be used for the treatment of oral cancer. Published in the "U.S. National Library of Medicine."
Liver cancer studies:
Anti-tumor effect of cannabinoids on hepatocellular carcinoma: role of AMPK-dependent activation of autophagy (Anti-tumoral action of cannabinoids on hepatocellular carcinoma: role of AMPK-dependent activation of autophagy - 2011)
This research aimed to determine what the effects of THC on cancer cells in the liver. It has been found that the growth of THC and the effectiveness of these cancer cells is reduced, which means that THC should be further examined as a therapeutic treatment. Published in the "U.S. National Library of Medicine."
Pancreatic cancer studies:
Cannabinoids induce apoptosis of pancreatic tumor cells via endoplasmic reticulum stress-related genes (Cannabinoids Induce Apoptosis of Pancreatic Tumor Cells via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Related Genes - 2006)
This study suggests that pancreatic tumor tissue seems to have a much higher number of cannabinoid receptors compared to normal pancreatic tissues. The study found that, when the cannabinoids are administered to cancer cells began to die by apoptosis, resulting in a reduction in the growth and spread of the tumor. Published in "The American Journal of Cancer."